Wildlife in Sri Lanka

Home to a variety of species such as the majestic elephant, leopard and proud peacocks, holidays in Sri Lanka is adventurous and exiting for nature lovers. Packed with activity and safaris to select from, Classy Tours offers personalized packages for you and family.

Travel in Sri Lanka, amidst the thick forest and rich flora and fauna in the wild life parks are a memorizing experience. Sri Lanka, a biodiversity hotspot has many endemic species roaming freely in the greenery.

We arrange safaris with expert guides to help you spot elephants and leopards in the wild. Keep your cameras turned on, to capture the real beauty in the wild and travel to places such as Yala, Wilpathu and Udawalawe to flexible schedules of your choice.

Udawalawe National Park

Udawalawe National Park lies on the boundary of Sabaragamuwa and Uva Provinces. The reserve covers 30,821 hectares of land area and was established on 30 June 1972. Udawalawe lies on the boundary of Sri Lanka's wet and dry zones.

Udawalawe is an important habitat for water birds and Sri Lankan elephants. It is a popular tourist destination and the third most visited park in the country.

Wilpattu National Park

Wilpattu National Park is located in the Northwest coast lowland dry zone of Sri Lanka. The unique feature of this park is the existence of "Willus" - Natural, sand-rimmed water basins or depressions that fill with rainwater.

The park is 131, 693 hectares and ranges from 0 to 152 meters above sea level. Wilpattu is the largest and one of the oldest National Parks in Sri Lanka. Wilpattu is among the top national parks world-renowned for its leopard population.

Wasgamuwa National Park

Wasgamuwa National Park is a natural park in Sri Lanka situated in the Matale and Polonnaruwa Districts. Wasgamuwa National Park spanning over 36,900 hectares is bordered by River Mahaweli Ganga and River Amban Ganga in east and west.

The center of the attraction is herds of elephants up to 150. The best time to enjoy the sight of large herds is during November to May.

Gal Oya National Park

GAL OYA NATIONAL PARK lies in the southeast of Sri Lanka and to the west of Ampara. Gal Oya National Park in Sri Lanka was established in 1954 and serves as the main catchment area for Senanayake Samudraya, the largest reservoir in Sri Lanka.

An important feature of the Gal Oya National Park is its elephant herd that can be seen throughout the year.

Yala National Park

Yala National Park is the most visited and second largest national park in Sri Lanka. The park consists of five blocks, two of which are now open to the public, and also adjoining parks. It is situated in the southeast region of the country, and lies in Southern Province and Uva Province. The park covers 979 square kilometres.

The number of mammals that has been recorded from the park is 44, and it has one of the highest leopard densities in the world.

Horton Plains National Park

Horton Plains National Park is a protected area in the central highlands of Sri Lanka and is covered by montane grassland and cloud forest. It is rich in bio-diversity and many species found here are endemic to the region. It is also a popular tourist destination and is situated 8 kilometres from Ohiya.

Large herds of Sri Lankan sambar deer feature as typical mammals, and the park is also an Important Bird Area with many species not only endemic to Sri Lanka but restricted to the Horton Plains.

Sinharaja Forest Reserve

Sinharaja Forest Reserve is a national park and a biodiversity hotspot in Sri Lanka. It is of international significance and has been designated a Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

More than 60% of the trees are endemic and many of them are considered rare. There is much endemic wildlife, especially birds, but the reserve is also home to over 50% of Sri Lanka's endemic species of mammals and butterflies, as well as many kinds of insects, reptiles and rare amphibians.